Nasty Little Rat (Just a Foolish Boy)

A slightly odd being with a taste for writing, music, and dark things. Unfortunately, it has also been dragged into fandom.

I'm Sebastian, in a relationship, and I sign with S B-L or Sebastian Loch.

weisbrot:

Les amis hanging out on campus :D
mood song “elle me dit”- MIKA

7 minutes ago on August 28th | J | 530 notes

foxmouth:

Perpetual Calendar, 2013 | by Arina Pozdnyak
36 minutes ago on August 28th | J | 68,323 notes
albinos-ruined-me:

by ASK※Permission to upload this was given by the artist

albinos-ruined-me:

by ASK
※Permission to upload this was given by the artist
1 hour ago on August 28th | J | 3,791 notes

ODDO Leather's accesories

1 hour ago on August 28th | J | 841 notes
2 hours ago on August 27th | J | 86,723 notes
2 hours ago on August 27th | J | 358 notes
mae-govannen:

Eowyn by kimberly80

mae-govannen:

Eowyn by kimberly80

3 hours ago on August 27th | J | 15 notes

sentientarboroform:

spiritsflame:

If whats happening in Ferguson was happening to an all white community, it would be called a dystopian novel

#and all actions against the police would be heroic and daring#and the plucky white protags would be encouraged to use violence to stop the injustice

3 hours ago on August 27th | J | 31,768 notes

adreadfulidea:

THE RIVER STYX: A RETELLING OF HADES AND PERSEPHONE

Myths grow in the telling. We change them when we pass them on. We remake them to suit ourselves. Everyone knows the stories. But what if the stories are wrong?

There is more to the world than your cold and lonely kingdom, Hades. I could show it to you.

And the price?

A handful of seeds.

Starring Gillian Anderson as Hades and Lupita Nyong’o as Persephone. 

3 hours ago on August 27th | J | 1,424 notes

wafflesex:

WHAT THE FUCK WAS THAT EPISODE

I FEEL LIKE I JUST GOT SHOT IN THE HEART WITH EVERY POSSIBLE AND IMAGINABLE FEELING IN THE UNIVERSE

AND THEN THEY HAVE THE GALL TO PLAY THE HAPPY HAPPY JOY JOY THEME SONG AT THE END

FUCK YOU, KYOANI. NO, I DON’T WANT TO BE A FUTURE FISH.

4 hours ago on August 27th | J | 703 notes
Tagged as: #AcCURATE #Free! 
mythandrists:

Women of the Classical World | Dread Persephone

The rape of Persephone is one of the earliest recorded Greek myths, and the most often misappropriated. Persephone’s capture by Hades is an allegory for the Greek institution of marriage, but what’s often overlooked is how closely this myth correlates to the real-life horrors of marriage and womanhood in ancient Greece.
Before Persephone’s capture, she lives with her mother, Demeter, and is known by the name Κόρη, which literally translates to “girl” or “virgin.” When the god Hades - her much older uncle - sees her, he falls instantly in love, and asks Zeus, Persephone’s father-uncle and Hades’ brother, for her hand in marriage. When Hades carries her away on his chariot, she is still a young teenager, probably between thirteen and fifteen years of age - the Greeks’ idea of a healthy marriageable age for girls.

ἁρπάξας δ’ ἀέκουσαν ἐπὶ χρυσέοισιν ὄχοισινἧγ’ ὀλοφυρομένην· ἰάχησε δ’ ἄρ’ ὄρθια φωνῇ,κεκλομένη πατέρα Κρονίδην ὕπατον καὶ ἄριστον.
And he seized the unwilling girl up on his golden chariotas she wailed, and she cried out in her clear voice,pleading with her father, Zeus the best and highest. (Hom. Hymn 2 to Demeter)

So Persephone goes down to Hades as an unwilling bride. This parallels a traditional Greek marriage ceremony, in which the bride was led through the streets by her new husband, who gripped her by the wrist as she looked at the ground and followed him, submissively, to his house.
Persephone’s myth has a supposedly happy ending: It’s said that she grew to consider the Underworld home, and that she rivaled the other gods in power. Hades was faithful to his wife, unlike most Greek gods, and because she was a goddess, Persephone was granted the concession that she would be able to visit her mother for a few months every year - a concession that mortal women might not have been given. In short, the myth of Persephone and Hades tells us two things: First, the Greeks believed that a woman who was forced would come to love her husband; and second, that the Greeks believed that a woman could only become powerful by accepting the wishes of her father and husband and learning to make the best of her new home after marriage.
You can read Homeric Hymn 2, in which Persephone’s story is told, here. The story is also told in Apollodorus’ Library 1.29, Ovid’s Metamorphoses Book 5, and referenced in Cicero’s In Verrem 2.4, among others. Photo credit to Luminous Lu.

mythandrists:

Women of the Classical World | Dread Persephone

The rape of Persephone is one of the earliest recorded Greek myths, and the most often misappropriated. Persephone’s capture by Hades is an allegory for the Greek institution of marriage, but what’s often overlooked is how closely this myth correlates to the real-life horrors of marriage and womanhood in ancient Greece.

Before Persephone’s capture, she lives with her mother, Demeter, and is known by the name Κόρη, which literally translates to “girl” or “virgin.” When the god Hades - her much older uncle - sees her, he falls instantly in love, and asks Zeus, Persephone’s father-uncle and Hades’ brother, for her hand in marriage. When Hades carries her away on his chariot, she is still a young teenager, probably between thirteen and fifteen years of age - the Greeks’ idea of a healthy marriageable age for girls.

ἁρπάξας δ’ ἀέκουσαν ἐπὶ χρυσέοισιν ὄχοισιν
ἧγ’ ὀλοφυρομένην· ἰάχησε δ’ ἄρ’ ὄρθια φωνῇ,
κεκλομένη πατέρα Κρονίδην ὕπατον καὶ ἄριστον.

And he seized the unwilling girl up on his golden chariot
as she wailed, and she cried out in her clear voice,
pleading with her father, Zeus the best and highest. (Hom. Hymn 2 to Demeter)

So Persephone goes down to Hades as an unwilling bride. This parallels a traditional Greek marriage ceremony, in which the bride was led through the streets by her new husband, who gripped her by the wrist as she looked at the ground and followed him, submissively, to his house.

Persephone’s myth has a supposedly happy ending: It’s said that she grew to consider the Underworld home, and that she rivaled the other gods in power. Hades was faithful to his wife, unlike most Greek gods, and because she was a goddess, Persephone was granted the concession that she would be able to visit her mother for a few months every year - a concession that mortal women might not have been given. In short, the myth of Persephone and Hades tells us two things: First, the Greeks believed that a woman who was forced would come to love her husband; and second, that the Greeks believed that a woman could only become powerful by accepting the wishes of her father and husband and learning to make the best of her new home after marriage.

You can read Homeric Hymn 2, in which Persephone’s story is told, here. The story is also told in Apollodorus’ Library 1.29, Ovid’s Metamorphoses Book 5, and referenced in Cicero’s In Verrem 2.4, among others. Photo credit to Luminous Lu.

4 hours ago on August 27th | J | 1,168 notes
littlevikiing:

"Tomorrow in the battle think on me." Richard III by William Shakespeare.

littlevikiing:

"Tomorrow in the battle think on me." Richard III by William Shakespeare.

4 hours ago on August 27th | J | 35 notes

kerbyrosanes:

"CORONATION"

11.7” x 16.5”
Uni Pin pens 
190 gsm Hahnemuhle fine art paper

Personal piece available in 10 limited edition of 12x18” prints for sale, signed and numbered via La Creme de la Creme.

———————
Facebook | DeviantArt | Twitter | Behance | Instagram | Shop

5 hours ago on August 27th | J | 1,569 notes

yuusane:

Makoto CN: Itsuki

Haruka CN: Kery

5 hours ago on August 27th | J | 20,614 notes

hydrophobic-pirate:

On 9th August 2014, unarmed 18 year old Michael Brown was shot by police officer Darren Wilson in Ferguson, Missouri, sparking social unrest that continues to this day. Here is a petition to prevent police misconduct.

6 hours ago on August 27th | J | 17,714 notes